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Programs 2017-08-16T15:40:25+00:00

Storytelling

Students build a physical representation of their personal legacy brick by brick using LEGO® Education StoryStarter kits. Students will photograph their Legocy sculptures and write a creative writing piece describing their personal legacy. Students will learn about various artists that use LEGO® bricks to bring their artistic ideas to life such as sculptor, Nathan Sawaya, Legographer, Andrew Whyte, and sculpture, Sean Kenney. This program can be adapted for grades 4-12 because of the shared Common Core objective: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. This program can be adapted to focus on the legacies of historical, contemporary, and cultural figures and events. This program can be tailored to meet specific grade level standards and school needs. Other possibilities for tailored programs include: bullying, leadership, character development, and Covey’s Seven Habits.

Funding available: United Arts Council and Durham Arts Council Artist in Schools program

Super Heroes Comic Book and Stop Motion Camp

Super villains plotting? Forces of evil set to strike? Is it a city in peril or the neighbor’s kitten stuck in a tree? Who can save them? Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s is a plane… It is YOU!  Let your inner superhero out! Create a hero, learn Language Arts storytelling techniques to chronicle the most incredibly awesome epic tale you ever told in your very own comic book or stop motion video using mini-figures and Legos. Rising 1st graders to 5th graders (will differentiate for each level)

Brick-a-Novel — K-12
Students work collaboratively as teams to create a story quilt of key plot points and scenes of short stories, books and plays using LEGO bricks. View this video to see a ninth grade Honors English class Brick-a-Novel Shakespeares’ Romeo and Juliet. This workshop can be tailored to other subjects.

Brick Scholars created a tailored workshop based on its program, “Brick-a-Novel,” for Early College EAST High School English I classes who studied Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” See this WNCT Channel 9 News video featuring the workshop for more detail.

Early College EAST High School is a STEM Early College and students are exposed to the engineering design process. Students are required to take an engineering course their freshmen year. Students transferred their design process skills to bricking “Romeo and Juliet” as they recreated the play in its entirety, recounting key plot points in each act. Students finished the workshop by building the theme of the play in groups. They used the 4C’s throughout the workshop — collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking. They are indeed, Brick Scholars.

Newspaper Article: Students use Legos to illustrate Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’

Brick Poetry — K-12
Students construct poetic devices (metaphors, similes) using LEGO bricks designed to be metaphorical and write poems from their engineered 3D poems.

Character Education, Social Skills, Communication

  • Bricking Our Way to Solutions

Students identify problems in their life, school, and/or community and create a solution using LEGO® bricks. Students write about their solution and present it to the class.

Bricking Our Way to Solutions — Grades K-8 Students identify a problem in their life, school, and/or community and imagineer a solution.

  • Brick Drama: Writing with Robotics Muse

Students construct LEGO® WeDo™ robots, program them, create their own stories and dramatize events.

Robotics & Coding

Space Adventures

A unique workshop in a galaxy not so far away that takes students into outer space. Students will construct, then program futuristic robotic models using LEGO Education WeDo 2.0, and write an epic story of their journey into space. This workshop/residency is sure to spark young imaginations as they explore and imagineer their way through the mysteries of outer space. Students return home with a digital storybook of their adventure that showcases photos of their robotic builds, storyscapes and adventures. Rising 2nd graders to 6th graders (will differentiate for each level).

Animal Safari Camp (Early Robotics and Storytelling)

Greetings brave adventurers — an Animal Safari awaits!  We will establish a base camp from which we journey out into the wild to encounter robotic animals that you build and program. Throughout our adventure we use our field book to observe the animals to learn about their habitat and most importantly, to journal our trek into the wild to take home. Rising 1st and 2nd graders.

Brick Tank: Maker Space and Inventor’s Lab

What are you going to invent?  Learn physical science concepts and simple machine principals then unleash your creativity to invent a robotic product.  To impress the Brick Panel you will learn to translate your vision into a great description with a tagline for presentation.  Can you win the Brick Panel over to select your invention? Rising 3rd graders to 6th graders (will challenge appropriate).

Advanced Robotics Day Camp: Building Bots with LEGO Mindstorms

This workshop/residency uses LEGO® Mindstorms to teach campers the basics of assembling and programming a robot with fun activities that allow students to show off their programming skills. They will learn to program the robot to follow a line, recognize when it needs to stop, and execute simple actions, such as lifting and carrying an object. Ultimately, students will use their robots to work together by creating a routine that all robots will participate in. Rising 4th graders to 9th graders (will challenge appropriately).

WeDo 2.0

Getting Started – 1 hour programs

Milo the Science Rover

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore ways scientists and engineers reach remote places.
  2. Create and program Milo the Science Rover
  3. Document how Milo can help you discover a special plant specimen

Milo’s Motion Sensor

In this project, students will:

  1. Create and program Milo’s object-detector arm using the Motion Sensor Input
  2. Document how Milo has found the special plant specimen

Milo’s Tilt Sensor

In this project, students will:

  1. Create and program Milo’s messaging arm using the Tilt Sensor
  2. Document Milo’s communication with the base.

Collaborating

In this project, students will:

  1. Create and program a device to move the plant sample
  2. Document and present how Milo’s mission went overall

Guided Projects – 90 minute programs

Pulling:

In this project, students will investigate the question, “What makes objects move?”

Students will:

  1. Explore what forces are and how they can make objects move.
  2. Create and program a robot to investigate the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.
  3. Document and present their findings about forces.

Speed:

In this project, students will investigate the question, “How can a car go faster?”

Students will:

  1. Explore what forces are and how they can make objects move.
  2. Create and program a robot to investigate the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.
  3. Document and present their findings about forces.

Robust Structures:

In this project, students will investigate the question, “What other factors make structures earthquake-resistant?”

Students will:

  1. Explore the origin and nature of earthquakes.
  2. Create and program a device that will allow you to test building designs.
  3. Document evidence and present your findings about which structure design(s) are best for withstanding earthquakes.

Frog Metamorphosis:

In this project, students will investigate the question, “How do frogs morph during their lives?”

Students will:

  1. Explore what they know about the stages in the life cycle of a frog, from birth to adult.
  2. Create and program a model of a young frog and then of an adult frog.
  3. Document the changing characteristics of their model throughput different stages of a frog’s life.

Plants and Pollinators:

In this project, students will investigate the question, “How do some organisms contribute to the life cycle of plants?”

Students will:

  1. Explore how different organisms take an active role in plant reproduction.
  2. Create and program a model of a bee and flower to mimic the relationship between the pollinator and the plant.
  3. Present and document the different models they have created of plants and their pollinators.

Drop and Rescue:

In this project, students will investigate the question, “How can you organize a safety mission after a weather-related hazard?”

Students will:

  1. Explore different weather-related hazards that can influence the survival of a population in their region.
  2. Create and program a device to relocate people and animals in a safe, easy-to-use, and respectful way or efficiently drop materials into an area.
  3. Present and document their solution and explain why their solution meets the criteria.

Sort to Recycle:

In this project, students will explore and investigate the question, “How can you improve recycling methods to reduce waster?

Students will:

  1. Explore how better sorting methods for recycling can aid in cutting back the amount of waste that is discarded.
  2. Create and program a device that will sort recyclables according to their size and shape.
  3. Present and document the solution they have developed.

Open Projects: These programs are more difficult and best done as follow-up programs to Guided Project field trips programs. This is a great program for gifted students. 90 minute program

 

Predator and Prey:

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore the different strategies animals use to catch their prey or to escape from their predators.
  2. Create and program a predator or prey in order to explore the relationship between them.
  3. Present and document their animal model, explaining the relationship between two species and how they are adapted to survive.

Open Projects: These programs are more difficult and best done as follow-up programs to Guided Project field trips programs. This is a great program for gifted students. 90 minute program

Animal Expression:

In this project, students:

  1. Explore different ways that animals communicate, including the unique methods of animals and insects that light up in the dark.
  2. Create and program an animal or insect to illustrate how it socially interacts with others of its species.
  3. Present and document their model, explaining how the animal communicates and how that helps the animal.

Extreme Habitats:

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore different environments around the globe and across time, and describe what they might tell us about the lifestyle and success of a species.
  2. Create and program an animal or reptile that could have lived in a particular habitat.
  3. Present and document their animal and its environment, explaining how their animal or reptile developed to survive.

 

Space Exploration:

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore actual missions of space rovers and imagine future possibilities.
  2. Create and program a space rover to achieve a specific task, such as: move in and out of a crater, collect a rock sample, drill a hole in the ground, etc.
  3. Present and document their prototype and what they could possibly discover by achieving these missions

***Space Exploration uses StoryStarter and Space Extension Kit.

 

Hazard Alarm:

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore different weather-related hazards that everyone needs to be aware of, like tsunamis, tornadoes, and hurricanes, and the warning systems in place to help protect them.
  2. Create and program a device that could warn people to take action because dangerous weather is coming.
  3. Present and document their solution and explain how it helps reduce the impact on the population.

*** Create a weather prototype and weather event using additional LEGO materials (StoryStarter).

 

Cleaning the Oceans:

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore why it is important to take care of the oceans and keep them clean of plastic debris.
  2. Create and program a device that can help physically collect plastics of certain types and sizes from the ocean.
  3. Present and document their device, and explain what their solution has been designed to collect and how it does that.

*** Build an ocean habitat using additional LEGO pieces and incorporate robot into a story using StoryStarter and StoryVisualizer

Wildlife Crossing:

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore the effect of road construction on animals and plans and imagine possibilities to reduce its impact.
  2. Create and program a device to allow animals to cross hazardous areas.
  3. Present and document their solution, and explain how the crossing has been designed with a particular animal in mind.

*** Build a habitat out of StoryStarter and create a digital comic book

Moving Materials:

In this project, students will:

  1. Explore different ways material is transported and assembled.
  2. Create and program a device that will help them carry and/or assemble different seized objects, considering safety, efficiency, and storage.
  3. Present and document their device and explain how it is designed to be safe and efficient.

 

*** For an increase in programming price $5 per student, programs can be enhanced by using LEGO kits that allow for building a habitat/setting/characters/story scenes/stories to accompany their robotic build. Students would have the option to build create a digital comic book documenting their story in photos and creative writing.

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